ObjectScript

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Cache tricks

Several years ago, long before Developer Community Portal was launched, I published a series of Caché tricks at one of Czech web sites. In this article, I’m posting translated version of one of them.

Capturing output of someone else’s methods or routines

Suppose you, or someone else created a useful method or routine, that was producing some computation that you’d like to benefit from, but the routine was writing output to process principal device.

You would like to use the data, but you need it not written to a device, but assigned to a variable. And, for any reason, you can’t modify the code. What can you do?

Last comment 26 July 2016
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              While Studio and Atelier are useful development interfaces, there are occasionally situations where a quick edit needs to be made to code and only terminal access is available.  A useful set of tools to do this are the zload, zprint, zinsert, zremove, and zsave commands.  These are abbreviated to zl, zp, zi, zr, and zs respectively.  While each of these commands has its own page in documentation, this article will synthesize that information with examples to provide instruction for their combined use.

Last comment 19 July 2016
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I have the following problem:

  • There are several classes with method generators, which needs to be compiled during every compilation
  • I have "ckub" qualifiers enabled in studio
  • I don't want to remove "u" qualifier because I need it very much in another namespaces

So how do I force classes with method generators to recompile when "u" qualifier is present?

Last comment 15 July 2016
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Order is a necessity for everyone, but not everyone understands it in the same way
(Fausto Cercignani)

Disclaimer: This article uses Russian language and Cyrillic alphabet as examples, but is relevant for anyone who uses Caché in a non-English locale.
Please note that this article refers mostly to NLS collations, which are different than SQL collations. SQL collations (such as SQLUPPER, SQLSTRING, EXACT which means no collation, TRUNCATE, etc.) are actual functions that are explicitly applied to some values, and whose results are sometimes explicitly stored in the global subscripts. When stored in subscripts, these values would naturally follow the NLS collation in effect (“SQL and NLS Collations”).

Last comment 10 June 2016
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