Developing a Full-Stack JavaScript web app with Caché requires you to bring together the right building blocks. In the previous part, we created a basic front-end React application. In the second part of this article series I will show how to choose the right back-end technology for your application. You will see Caché allows you to use many different approaches to link your front-end to your Caché server, depending on your application's needs. In this part we will set up a back-end with Node.js/QEWD and CSP/REST. In the next part we will enhance our basic web app and connect it to Caché using these technologies.

5 10
0 2,771

or "Didn't you say you would cover Persistent Objects in Part 5, Chris?"

Yes, that was the plan.  This is a pretty important topic, so it get's its own Article

Up until now, we've display widget JSON that has been created by a basic loop.  Clearly this isn't of much value.  Now we have our stack connected together, and we can see that the data is flowing to the Welcome page, it's time to complete the stack and start feeding our service from "real" data.

2 4
0 1,341

At the end of our last lesson, we ended with our page displaying a nice (but garish) Angular Material Toolbar, and our Widget data displaying in a list of Material cards.  Our page feels a bit static, and we already know that the large number of Widgets that we will be dealing with will not be especially usable on a static list.  What can we do to help?

3 0
0 1,087

So, one day you're working away at WidgetsDirect, the leading supplier of widget and widget accessories, when your boss asks you to develop the new customer facing portal to allow the client base to access the next generation of Widgets..... and he wants you to use Angular 1.x to read into the department's Caché server.   

There's only one problem:  You've never used Angular, and don't know how to make it talk to Caché.

This guide is going to walk through the process of setting up a full Angular stack which communicates with a Caché backend using JSON over REST.  

16 11
5 5,956

Developing a Full-Stack JavaScript web app with Caché requires you to bring together the right building blocks. Previously, I outlined the basic steps to install and connect Node.js to Caché and make it's powerful multi-model database capabilites available for use with Node.js. You can use Caché as a NoSQL-, document- (with unique key-level access!), SQL- and object-database with Node.js. When developing JavaScript applications, you'll see how powerful this combination is and makes Caché a perfect fit for Node.js.

In the first part of this article series I will show how to get started with the React framework, one of the most popular frameworks currently taking over front-end development. In the next parts you'll learn how to connect a basic web app to a Caché back-end.

You'll see, it's very easy to get started with this technology - you can even compare the amount of basic knowledge you need to COS because you only need to know a few basic concepts to start!

8 8
1 4,258

We finished our last lesson with our Widgets Direct page iterating over a list of widgets, displaying an ID and a Name value.  While we have been able to achieve this with only a small amount of coding, the page itself is not the most visually appealing place to be.  The AngularJS framework is providing a powerful Model-View-Controller framework for our structure and logic, but it does not implement anything that will provide a nice UI experience.

6 3
0 1,488

Full-Stack JavaScript development allows you to create state-of-the-art applications with Caché. With any (web) app you build nowadays, one has to make a lot of architectural decisions and you want to make the right ones. With the Node.js connector available for Caché, you can create a very powerful server side application server, allowing you to use the latest JavaScript technology and frameworks client- and server-side.

With all these new technologies, the most important is to integrate them in the most efficient way and to create a very productive development experience. This article willl get you started step-by-step with Node.js technology.

9 13
1 2,599
Article
Rob Tweed · Apr 18, 2017 1m read
Having your Node.js Cake and Eating It Too

I've mentioned the QEWD project in this group before: it's a Node.js-based platform for web, Native and REST applications which tightly integrates with Cache.  It uses a somewhat different philosophy to the use of Node.js than the norm, and I've now published an article that explains this approach and the unique benefits that arise as a result.

It turns out that, integrated via QEWD, Cache is an ideal bed-fellow for Node.js.  QEWD makes the integration of Cache and Node.js exceptionally fast, simple and intuitive to use, but also extremely powerful.

Read the article here: 

4 4
0 462

or "So you just got yelled at by your boss, for sending him an unformatted Hello World webpage"

Our previous lesson ended with us serving a Message value obtained from a Caché REST service to the client, using Angular as a runtime.  While there is a lot of moving parts involved in this process, the page is not especially exciting at the moment.  Before we can start adding new features, we should take a step back and review our tools.

11 1
1 2,183

Recently, a partner company started to develop an Angular client for their Cache application. Together, we decided to leverage the power of Caché dynamic objects to exchange JSON encoded data between client and server parts. However, we realized that currently there is a gap in Cache JSON implementation that prevents simple use of traditional registered and persistent classes to exposed their data with the same ease as with XML. I wrote a small JSON adapter, that does the job and bridgers the gap. It's purpose is simple expose data described by a regular Cache class in a one-to-one fashion to a %DynamicObject. On the other hand, when a serialized JSON data comes in, it can be easily deserialized into dynamic object and subsequently bound to regular class by the newly created adapter.

13 7
1 1,812
Article
Michael Smart · Oct 7, 2016 4m read
Forwarding Requests in a REST Service

One useful feature of our REST framework is the ability for a dispatch class to identify request prefixes and forward them to another dispatch class. This approach of modularizing your URL map will improve code readability, enable you to easily maintain separate versions of an interface, and provide a means to protect API calls that only certain users will be allowed to access.

7 1
0 3,060
Article
Istvan Hahn · Sep 23, 2016 6m read
Creating a RESTful Service using Ensemble

This is a detailed guide to develop RESTful services using InterSystems Ensemble. The goal of this guide is to make you understanding the basic concept and building blocks of a RESTful service. The service is going to provide a very basic functionality (a “Hello world!”).

You will learn how to create required components as Ensemble classes, configure the run-time as an Ensemble Production and create a service configuration as a web application.

4 1
0 2,132
Article
Istvan Hahn · Sep 21, 2016 7m read
REST in Pieces

A beginners guide to develop Ensemble RESTful web services.

Background

Before you start reading this short introduction please go through the on-line documentation of Ensemble with special attention to chapter “Creating REST services and clients with Ensemble”.

The approach in the documentation is undisputable the fastest and easiest way to create RESTful services. As a beginner I went through the documentation and I had several questions. This short article is listing those questions plus my humble answers.

9 6
0 2,050

Today I'm releasing a new EWD 3 module - ewd-feder8.

ewd-feder8 is a federation or integration platform, built as an extension of the EWD 3 ewd-xpress module.  So what does it do and what's it for? 

It's all about federating and integrating multiple web or REST service end-points.

At its simplest you can use it as a proxy server in front of a remote web service or REST end-point.

2 0
0 289

In this article I'll describe how to set up web services and/or REST services using EWD 3.

Since EWD 3 is designed to be modular, you can construct the environment that exactly meets your needs, but for much of the time you'll probably find that the pre-built EWD 3 ewd-xpress super-module does most of what you need because it hooks together all the core EWD 3 and other building-blocks you'll need:

4 1
1 1,217

Introduction

The field test of Caché 2016.2 has been available for quite some time and I would like to focus on one of the substantial features that is new in this version: the document data model. This model is a natural addition to the multiple ways we support for handling data including Objects, Tables and Multidimensional arrays. It makes the platform more flexible and suitable for even more use cases.

13 12
0 2,481

With the release of Cache 2016.1, JSON support was re-architected and made part of the core object model with the creation of %Object and %Array classes, which allow you to create dynamic JSON enabled objects and arrays.

On a recent demonstration I was working on, I had the need to create a REST web service that returned a JSON representation of a persistent object.  After searching for methods that would allow me to accomplish this, ultimately I found none, until now.

3 20
0 2,314