During runtime I build an object which is essentially a wrapper over in-memory table:

col1 ... colN
val11 ... valN1
val12 ... valN2

 

I want to use this object as a part of INSERT or UPDATE queries, based on a value of some column (the main use case one of the columns is an ID value)

What's the best way to expose the object to SQL?

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Question
Eduard Lebedyuk · Mar 17, 2020
Building $lb from C

I have a C string and I need to build a $lb from it.

This code works fine for strings shorter than 254 characters:

char *str = "some string";
int len = strlen(str);
int add = 2;
char *list = malloc(len + add + 1);
char lenChar = len + add;
sprintf(list, "%c\x01%s", lenChar, str);

Thought maybe someone can share the code for longer strings?

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Simple problem:

  1. I leave a long-running command in terminal
  2. Switch to another task(s)
  3. Remember that I need to check on my command after a few hours

Is there any way to force terminal to the foreground after current command ends?

This is Windows with cterm/iristerm although Putty/Kitty solution would also be nice.

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Asymmetric cryptography is a cryptographic system that uses pairs of keys: public keys which may be disseminated widely, and private keys which are known only to the owner. The generation of such keys depends on cryptographic algorithms based on mathematical problems to produce one-way functions. Effective security only requires keeping the private key private; the public key can be openly distributed without compromising security.

In such a system, any person can encrypt a message using the receiver's public key, but that encrypted message can only be decrypted with the receiver's private key.

Robust authentication is also possible. A sender can combine a message with a private key to create a short digital signature on the message. Anyone with the sender's corresponding public key can combine the same message and the supposed digital signature associated with it to verify whether the signature was valid, i.e. made by the owner of the corresponding private key. (C) Wikipedia.

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