This post provides useful links and an overview of best practice configuration for low latency storage IO by creating LVM Physical Extent (PE) stripes for database disks on InterSystems Data Platforms; InterSystems IRIS, Caché, and Ensemble.

Consistent low latency storage is key to getting the best database application performance. For applications running on Linux, Logical Volume Manager (LVM) is often used for database disks, for example because of the ability to grow volumes and filesystems or create snapshots for online backups. For database applications the parallelism of writes using LVM PE striped logical volumes can also help increase performance for large sequential reads and writes by improving the efficiency of the data I/O

Last comment 25 May 2018
+ 5   1 4
802

views

+ 5

rating

InterSystems Data Platform includes utilities and tools for system monitoring and alerting, however System Administrators new to solutions built on the InterSystems Data Platform (a.k.a Caché) need to know where to start and what to configure.

This guide shows the path to a minimum monitoring and alerting solution using references from online documentation and developer community posts to show you how to enable and configure the following;

  1. Caché Monitor: Scans the console log and sends emails alerts.

  2. System Monitor: Monitors system status and resources, generating notifications (alerts and warnings) based on fixed parameters and also tracks overall system health.

  3. Health Monitor: Samples key system and user-defined metrics and compares them to user-configurable parameters and established normal values, generating notifications when samples exceed applicable or learned thresholds.

  4. History Monitor: Maintains a historical database of performance and system usage metrics.

  5. pButtons: Operating system and Caché metrics collection scheduled daily.

Remember this guide is a minimum configuration, the included tools are flexible and extensible so more functionality is available when needed. This guide skips through the documentation to get you up and going. You will need to dive deeper into the documentation to get the most out of the monitoring tools, in the meantime, think of this as a set of cheat sheets to get up and running.

Last comment 11 March 2019
+ 10   3 4
675

views

+ 10

rating

A request came from a customer to estimate how long it would take to encrypt a database with cvencrypt utility.

This question is a little bit like how long is a piece of string — it depends. But its an interesting question. The answer primarily depends on the performance of CPU and storage on the target platform the customer is using, so the answer is more about coming up with a simple methodology that can be used to benchmark the CPU and storage while running cvencrypt.

Methodology

  1. Copy a large and representative CACHE.DAT file to target storage
  2. Create a keyfile via System Management Portal (includes a key)
  3. Run the cvencrypt over your sample CACHE.DAT file (as below)

The following shows the process once the test file is in place

+ 5   0 1
0

comments

340

views

+ 5

rating

I am often asked by customers, vendors or internal teams to explain CPU capacity planning for large production databases running on VMware vSphere.

In summary there are a few simple best practices to follow for sizing CPU for large production databases:

  • Plan for one vCPU per physical CPU core.
  • Consider NUMA and ideally size VMs to keep CPU and memory local to a NUMA node.
  • Right-size virtual machines. Add vCPUs only when needed.

Generally this leads to a couple of common questions

Last comment 8 November 2017
+ 5   0 3
3358

views

+ 5

rating

Note (Sept 2018): There have been big changes since this post first appeared, I suggest using the Docker Container version, the project and details for running as a container are still in the same place  published on GitHub so you can download, run - and modify if you need to

Last comment 11 May 2017
+ 8   1 5
897

views

+ 8

rating

In this post I show strategies for backing up Caché using External Backup with examples of integrating with snapshot based solutions. The majority of solutions I see today are deployed on Linux on VMware so a lot of the post shows how solutions integrate VMware snapshot technology as examples.

Caché backup - batteries included?

Caché online backup is included out of the box with a Caché install for uninterrupted backup of Caché databases. But there are more efficient backup solutions you should consider as systems scale up. External Backup integrated with snapshot technologies is the recommended solution for backing up systems including Caché databases.

Are there any special considerations for external backup?

Online documentation for External Backup has all the details. A key consideration is

Last comment 16 November 2018
+ 12   1 5
4100

views

+ 12

rating

This post provides guidelines for configuration, system sizing and capacity planning when deploying Caché 2015 and later on a VMware ESXi 5.5 and later environment.

I jump right in with recommendations assuming you already have an understanding of VMware vSphere virtualization platform. The recommendations in this guide are not specific to any particular hardware or site specific implementation, and are not intended as a fully comprehensive guide to planning and configuring a vSphere deployment -- rather this is a check list of best practice configuration choices you can make. I expect that the recommendations will be evaluated for a specific site by your expert VMware implementation team.


A list of other posts in the InterSystems Data Platforms and performance series is here.

+ 8   3 2
0

comments

3019

views

+ 8

rating

Hyper-Converged Infrastructure (HCI) solutions have been gaining traction for the last few years with the number of deployments now increasing rapidly. IT decision makers are considering HCI when scoping new deployments or hardware refreshes especially for applications already virtualised on VMware. Reasons for choosing HCI include; dealing with a single vendor, validated interoperability between all hardware and software components, high performance especially IO, simple scalability by addition of hosts, simplified deployment and simplified management

Last comment 16 August 2017
+ 7   0 6
1848

views

+ 7

rating

This is a list of all the posts in the data platforms capacity planning and performance series in order. Also a general list of my other posts. I will update as new posts in the series are added.


Capacity Planning and Performance Series

Generally posts build on previous, but you can also just dive in to subjects that look interesting

+ 10   0 14
0

comments

2953

views

+ 10

rating

Here in Community I use the WYSIWYG Text format control to answer questions and other quick text entries.

But for longer posts when I want formatting or if I am building incrementally over several days I use the Plain text (supports markdown) control because it's quicker and easier to post an article I have written offline. In this post I share my workflow and a set of tools to publish long read posts.

+ 6   0 4
362

views

+ 6

rating