ObjectScript

Syndicate content 26 


Hello!

This article is a small overview of a tool that helps to understand classes and their structure inside the Caché DBMS.

In short, it visualizes a class or an entire package, shows the relations between classes and provides all the possible information to developers and team leads without making them go to Caché Studio and examine the code there.

If you are learning InterSystems Caché, reviewing Caché projects a lot or just interested in something new in InterSystems Technology solutions — you are more than welcome to read the overview of Caché Class Explorer!

Last comment 3 July 2018
1 11
2791

views

+ 17

rating

Greetings, InterSystems community!

I am pleased to announce that the web terminal project, Caché WebTerminal version 4 gets its release! After long period of enhancing this web application from 2013, it came to the version 4, which features major stability and security improvements, intelligent autocomplete and syntax highlighting, convenient SQL mode and a lot of other useful features.

The goal of this article is to spread the knowledge about this project over the InterSystems community.

Last comment 29 January 2018
1 7
1433

views

+ 14

rating

Class Queries in InterSystems Caché is a useful tool that separates SQL queries from Caché Object Script code. Basically, it works like this: suppose that you want to use the same SQL query with different arguments in several different places.In this case you can avoid code duplication by declaring the query body as a class query and then calling this query by name. This approach is also convenient for custom queries, in which the task of obtaining the next row is defined by a developer. Sounds interesting? Then read on!

Last comment 9 December 2016
0 9
3381

views

+ 14

rating

Importance and Collection of Exact Version Information ($zv / $zversion)
 
The explanation of:
- why collecting $zv is important (The WHY),
- what the components of $zv mean (The WHAT),
- and how to collect $zv (The HOW). 
(The Ultimate $zv Guide to the ISC Galaxy in large, friendly letters)
Last comment 15 November 2016
0 7
650

views

+ 13

rating

1.About this article

Just like Caché pattern matching, Regular Expressions can be used in Caché to identify patterns in text data – only with a much higher expressive power. This article provides a brief introduction into Regular Expressions and what you can do with it in Caché. The information provided herein is based on various sources, most notably the book “Mastering Regular Expressions” by Jeffrey Friedl and of course the Caché online documentation. The article is not intended to discuss all the possibilities and details of regular expressions. Please refer to the information sources listed in chapter 5 if you would like to learn more. If you prefer to read off-line you can also download the PDF version of this article.

Last comment 11 January 2018
1 7
1681

views

+ 11

rating

Have you ever thought what could be a reason why some development environment (database, language) would eventually become popular? What part of this popularity could be explain as language quality?

Last comment 17 January 2017
0 1
614

views

+ 9

rating

Order is a necessity for everyone, but not everyone understands it in the same way
(Fausto Cercignani)

Disclaimer: This article uses Russian language and Cyrillic alphabet as examples, but is relevant for anyone who uses Caché in a non-English locale.
Please note that this article refers mostly to NLS collations, which are different than SQL collations. SQL collations (such as SQLUPPER, SQLSTRING, EXACT which means no collation, TRUNCATE, etc.) are actual functions that are explicitly applied to some values, and whose results are sometimes explicitly stored in the global subscripts. When stored in subscripts, these values would naturally follow the NLS collation in effect (“SQL and NLS Collations”).

Last comment 10 June 2016
0 0
1441

views

+ 9

rating

 

Cache tricks

Several years ago, long before Developer Community Portal was launched, I published a series of Caché tricks at one of Czech web sites. In this article, I’m posting translated version of one of them.

Capturing output of someone else’s methods or routines

Suppose you, or someone else created a useful method or routine, that was producing some computation that you’d like to benefit from, but the routine was writing output to process principal device.

You would like to use the data, but you need it not written to a device, but assigned to a variable. And, for any reason, you can’t modify the code. What can you do?

Last comment 26 July 2016
0 4
1234

views

+ 8

rating

In this article I would like to tell you about macros in InterSystems Caché. A macro is a symbolic name that is replaced with a set of instructions during compilation. A macro can “unfold” in various instruction sets each time it is called, depending on the parameters passed to it and activated scenarios. This can be both static code and the result of ObjectScript execution. Let's take a look at how you can use them in your application.

Last comment 24 July 2017
0 5
911

views

+ 8

rating

This is a translation of the following article. Thanks @Evgeny Shvarov  for the help in translation.

Let's assume that you wrote a program that shows "Hello World!", for example:

  write "Hello, World!"

The program works and everyone is happy.

With time, however, your program becomes more complex, gets more features and you eventually need to show the same string in different languages. Moreover you don't know the number and names of these languages.

The spoiler below contains a description of how the task of multi-language localization is solved in Caché.

Last comment 20 May 2017
0 1
246

views

+ 7

rating

Quotes (1NF/2NF/3NF)ru:

Every row-and-column intersection contains exactly one value from the applicable domain (and nothing else).
The same value can be atomic or non-atomic depending on the purpose of this value. For example, “4286” can be
  • atomic, if its denotes “a credit card’s PIN code” (if it’s broken down or reshuffled, it is of no use any longer)
  • non-atomic, if it’s just a “sequence of numbers” (the value still makes sense if broken down into several parts or reshuffled)

This article explores the standard methods of increasing the performance of SQL queries involving the following types of fields: string, date, simple list (in the $LB format), "list of <...>" and "array of <...>".

0 3
0

comments

299

views

+ 6

rating